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It is the intension of this debate forum to provide a platform for parties with an interest in group analysis – and where posted material on topics / terms of importance to the group analysis can be discussed.
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Date:
07-09-2016 at 23:06
author:
Paul Benér
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As conductor of a slow open analytic group I find it helpful to think “winnicottia”. I propose that the work and process of the analytic group can be understood and conducted with the help of Winnicott.
Date:
07-09-2016 at 22:59
author:
Lars Bo Jørgensen
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The notion or concept of “Basic Law of Group dynamics” is already introduced by Foulkes in his first book – Introduction to group Analytic Psychotherapy (1948). This appears in a discussion on how group psychotherapy and even social therapy create formation/transformation for the group as well as the individual. 
Date:
07-09-2016 at 22:32
author:
Hanne Larsson
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Using psychoanalysis to understand and work with groups has taken different ways, where group analysis building primarily on S. H. Foulkes is one, psychodynamic organizational theory and praxis building primarily on W. Bion and the Tavistock tradition is another. Both use ordinary words from English language to describe psychic phenomenons, which makes it difficult to assess if they are used stringent and in the same way or not. Some common concepts and some comparisons of concepts are made in the text.
Date:
07-09-2016 at 22:19
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author:
Shulamit Geller
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The concept "Median Group" written by Shulamit Geller, Tel Aviv, Israel. 

She follows the concept as it was outlined by Patrick de Mare and the development of the concept up till nowadays. 

Date:
29-03-2016 at 19:26
author:
Teresa von Sommaruga Howard
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In this text you will see key concepts from Patrick de Maré developed by Tereasa von Sommaruga Howard: Outsight - Transposition - Median group - Culture - Mind and Dialogue. 

Outsight: “Whereas insight is the inwardly oriented expansion of consciousness, outsight refers to the outward expansion of social consciousness and thoughtfulness” ….

Date:
16-07-2015 at 13:50
author:
Henrik Lund- Jacobsen
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The Group Monopolizer. A serious challenge in group therapy by Henrik Lund-Jacobsen, physician, Specialist in family medicine, Group analyst (iga/cph).

Tensions and conflicts between group members can usually be improved by the conjoint effort of the conductor and the group. 

However with a monopolist in the group, it is the task of the conductor to interrupt the behavioral pattern, to avoid isolation and eventually scapegoating of the monopolist.

Date:
15-07-2015 at 22:13
author:
Søren Aagaard
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Dreams in Group Analysis; a Review and a Doubtful Reflection by  Søren Aagaard, Clinical psychologist, Group analyst (iga/cph, gasi), Psychoanalyst /dpas/cph, iga)

To whom does one relate one´s dreams?  (Ferenczi 1912)

Intro:

Dreaming, dreams, dream telling and dream-work is most valued in Group Analysis (GA). But also dreams, due to their  ”nature”, bring with them both theoretical and therapeutically most intriguing   challenges and perspectives.

Date:
15-10-2014 at 11:30
author:
Peter Gottlieb
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With its fixed boundaries in time and space and its infinite room for thoughts and

emotions the analytical group may be understood as functioning on several levels, one

of which is the socalled projective level (Foulkes 1964, p 115). On this level the other

members unconsciously may be perceived as representations of one's inner objects,

including the concepts of the good and evil breast (Klein 1952), so that the analytical

work makes it possible to reach the primitive feelings belonging to the so-called

paranoid-schizoid and depressive positions (Klein 1946)

Date:
15-10-2014 at 11:25
author:
Svein Tjelta
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Translation in GA by Svein Tjelta, - training and supervising group analyst and lecturer

The roots of the term consists of the word trans that is a Latin noun or prefix, meaning "across", "beyond" or "on the opposite side", and Lation that is latin for “state or quality”. Translation has a number of possible meanings:

1.To turn from one language into another or from a foreign language into one's own:

2.to change the form, condition, nature, etc., of; transform; convert:

to translate wishes into deeds.

3.to explain in terms that can be more easily understood; interpret.

4.to bear, carry, or move from one place, position, etc., to another; transfer.

5.Mechanics. to cause (a body) to move without rotation or angular displacement; subject to translation(ODE.com)

Date:
08-09-2014 at 23:10
author:
Per Sørensen
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Socializing is a force working in society and cultivated in therapeutic groups, which can be seen as the individual drift towards the collective norm, as a translation in the group of unconscious to conscious and the autistic to the social, where in Foulkes expression “the accumulated soot in the ivory towers is swept clean”.
Date:
08-09-2014 at 23:05
author:
Helle Østerby Andersen
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The group is more than a group of individuals and at the same time a collection of individuals is an understanding that pervades the group analytic theory. We are talking about the group- as – a-whole and emphasising the whole is more than the sum of its parts. But what do we mean when we say greater than and different from the sum of individuals what composes the-group-as –a-whole. And what makes the transformation - what kind of energy from one to whole? How to describe from parts to whole from individual relating to grouping relating. Individuality to Grouping and reversed?
Date:
21-08-2014 at 22:13
author:
Søren Aagaard
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GAD – introduction for Lisbon Symposium July 2014

 Søren Aagaard

Date:
25-07-2014 at 13:30
author:
Paul Bèner
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Foulkes stated that we are and become who we are through communication or failure of communication. He said that the individual is an abstraction and the basis for the individual self is group relations. The work of Winnicott is all the way permeated and based on relationships. He concluded that we from birth are dependent and need the other to become a subject. Ormay (2012) reminds us of that “one person is no person” and introduces the concept of “nos” for us to be able to think about what drives us to relate, need and help others, compared to “ego”, that preserves and protects our borders. In group analytic theory there are references to Winnicott, conceptualizing phenomena in the life of a therapy group with Winnicotts understanding of, for instance, concepts as potential space, transitional objects and holding (James 1982, 2000. Nitsun (1989, 1996). The analytic therapeutic group is gathered to try to develop and change the object relations for the group and individuals through the process of communication in the matrix (Aagaard 1999, Dahlin 1979).  My interest has been focused on the relationship between the group, the individual and the self and in my paper at the 16th European Symposium regarding GAD, I will suggest a definition and present how the group functions as a potential space, a transitional area where feelings creatively can be used for experiencing the self in relationship to others and therefore to oneself.
Date:
18-05-2014 at 19:54
author:
Paul Bèner
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As conductor of a slow open analytic group for more than four years now, I find it helpful to think “Winnicotian”. In a thesis I propose that the work and process of the analytic group can be understood and conducted with the help of Winnicott. Clinical examples of what I interpret as manifestations of potential space, true and false self, and the capacity to be alone, fear of breakdown and incommunicado are be presented there.
In group analytic theory there are references to Winnicott, conceptualizing phenomena in the life of a therapy group with Winnicotts understanding of, for instance, potential space, transitional object and holding (James 1982, 2000. Nitsun (1989, 1996). The analytic therapeutic group is gathered to try to develop and change the object relations for the group and individuals through the process of communication in the matrix (Aagaard 1999, Dahlin 1979). My interest has been focused on the relationship between the group, the individual and the self and also of thinking of the matrix as a form of potential space. T H Ogden’s (Ogden 1989, 1992, 1994) understanding of Winnicotts concepts has been valuable.
In contrast to theoretical work in group analysis where the work of Winnicott is referred to, I try to investigate the clinical implications if Winnicott had been conductor, so to say. Here I would like to discuss Winnicotts formulations of his understanding of phenomena such as True and False Self, the capacity to be alone and fear of breakdown.
Date:
14-05-2014 at 22:16
Heading:
author:
Orit Mass-Goldman
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Introduction :
Foulkes regarded exchange as an important therapeutic factor which was specific to his model of group analysis. He wrote:
'Explanations and information, for which there is a great demand and surprising interest ,are of course not peculiar to the group situation ,but in one respect there is a significant difference: that is the element of exchange. This not only makes discussion more lively and full , but alters the emotional situation, just as children accept many things from each other which they would oppose if they came from their parents…..'
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